Quichua Thinking on the Causes of Rain and Weather 

Related:  Quichua Oral Tradition on Thunder

Links:   Carrión Cachot, Rebeca: EL CULTO AL AGUA EN EL ANTIGUO PERÚ – La Paccha, elemento cultural panandino​

The following videos present Quichua narratives on rain and weather.  As a guide to understanding them I suggest the following four theses:

 

1.  In Quichua thinking weather is an outpouring of the local earth's emotions whether of sadness, joy, sexual arousal, or anger.  

2. Because humans, plants and animals are a part of this local earth their emotions are also closely tied to the weather. 

3.  Because their emotions are tied to the weather the sadness of people, plants, or animals can cause or "call" rain.  Human crying or the sadness expressed in the drooping of thirsty tree leaves can trigger an empathetic sadness in the earth which results in the crying of rain.

4. Because the emotion of people, plants, and animals are all tied together their emotions affect each other.  This means that one species can feel and express the sorrow of another.  Certain species like the swallows that circle high into the sky at the end of the dry season or the trees whose branches extend high into the air are better positioned to communicate the desire for rain that many smaller terrestrial species feel and hence they, more than others, are said to call rain.

Eulodia Dagua, "Weather and the Emotions of Birds, Fish, and Humans"  

Tod Swanson interviews Eulodia Dahua.   In Pastaza Kichwa with English subtitles.

 

In this video Eulodia Dagua expresses her belief that human, plant, and animal emotions are all closely tied to the weather. 

Cite video as:

Tod D. Swanson,  "Eulodia Dagua, 'Weather and the Emotions of Birds, Fish, and Humans.'''  Youtube video. 2:30  April 11, 2015. https://youtu.be/RUQE-SnPM1Q

"The Trees Call Rain."  Tod Swanson interviews Delicia Dagua and Eulodia Dahua.   In Pastaza Kichwa with English subtitles.

 

In this video Delicia Dagua and Eulodia Dagua expresses their belief that trees have emotions like humans do and that it is the trees that "call" rain.   Without the trees to call rain the earth would dry up.

 

Cite video as:

Tod Swanson,  "Felicia Dagua and Eulodia Dagua, "The Trees Call Rain."'  Youtube video. 3:34. April 25, 2015. https://youtu.be/L3zMiRhCJIg    Teaching materials

Pedro Andi, "Swallows Call the Rain."  From Tod Swanson interview of Pedro Andi.  In Tena Quichua with English subtitles.

 

In this video Pedro Andi expresses his belief that swallows circling high in the air at the end of the dry season or dancing to call rain.

Text of English Translation

Cite video as:

Tod Swanson,  "Pedro Andi 'The Swallows Call Rain.'" Youtube video. 6:55.  March 30, 2016. https://youtu.be/bWv-Y_b1-fE

Eulodia Dagua, "It Is the Trees That Cause Rain." 

 

Tod Swanson interviews Eulodia Dahua in Pastaza Quichua with Quichua subtitles.

Cite video as:

Tod D. Swanson,  "Eulodia Dagua, It Is the Trees That Cause Rain.''' Youtube video. 0:58  April 3, 2014. https://youtu.be/6ksBXBQYUlk

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